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The_Rorschach The_Rorschach is offline
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Old Apr 7th, 2003, 04:15 PM        The Taliban is Back. . or Bush's Unfinished War
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au...%5E401,00.html

Taliban 'back' in Afghanistan
April 07, 2003


BEFORE executing the International Red Cross worker, the Taliban gunmen made a satellite telephone call to their superior for instructions.
Kill him, the order came back, and Ricardo Munguia, whose body was found with 20 bullet wounds last month, became the first foreign aid worker to die in Afghanistan since the Taliban lost power 18 months ago.
The manner of his death suggests the Taliban is not only determined to remain a force in this country, but is reorganising and reviving its command structure.
There is little to stop them. The soldiers and police who were supposed to be the bedrock of a stable postwar Afghanistan have gone unpaid for months and are drifting away.
At a time when the United States is promising a reconstructed democratic postwar Iraq, many Afghans remember hearing similar promises not long ago.
Instead, what they see is thieving warlords, murder on the roads, and a resurgence of Taliban vigilantism.
"It's like I am seeing the same movie twice and no-one is trying to fix the problem," said Ahmed Wali Karzai, the brother of Afghanistan's president and his representative in the southern city of Kandahar.
"What was promised to Afghans with the collapse of the Taliban was a new life of hope and change. But what was delivered? Nothing. Everyone is back in business."
Karzai said reconstruction has been painfully slow -- a canal repaired, a piece of city road paved, a small school rebuilt.
"There have been no significant changes for people," he said. "People are tired of seeing small, small projects. I don't know what to say to people any more."
When the Taliban ruled they forcibly conscripted young men. "Today I can say, 'We don't take your sons away by force to fight at the front line,"' Karzai remarked. "But that's about all I can say."
From safe havens in neighbouring Pakistan, aided by militant Muslim groups there, the Taliban launched their revival to coincide with the war in Iraq and capitalise on Muslim anger over the US invasion, Afghan officials say.
Karzai said the Taliban were allied with rebel commander Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, supported by Pakistan and financed by militant Arabs.
The attacks have targeted foreigners and the threats have been directed toward Afghans working for international organisations.
Abdul Salam is a military commander for the government. Last month he was stopped at a Taliban checkpoint in the Shah Wali Kot district of Kandahar and became a witness to the killing of Munguia, a 39-year-old water engineer from El Salvador.
After stopping Munguia and his three-vehicle convoy, gunmen made a phone call to Mullah Dadullah, a powerful former Taliban commander who happens to have an artificial leg provided by the Red Cross.
Mimicking a telephone receiver by cupping a hand on his ear, Salam recalled the gunmen's side of the conversation.
"I heard him say Mullah Dadullah," he said. "I heard him ask for instructions."
When the conversation ended the Taliban moved quickly, Salam said. They shoved Munguia behind one of the vehicles, siphoned gasoline from the tanks and used it to set the vehicles on fire.
Munguia was standing nearby. One Taliban raised his Kalashnikov rifle and fired at Manguia.
Then they told the others, "You are working with kafirs (unbelievers). You are slaves of Karzai and Karzai is a slave to America."
"This time we will let you go because you are Afghan," Salam remembered them saying, "but if we find you again and you are still working for the government we will kill you."
In the latest killing in southern Afghanistan, gunmen shot to death Haji Gilani, a close Karzai ally, on Thursday. Gilani was one of the first people to shelter Karzai when he secretly entered Afghanistan to foment a rebellion against the Taliban in late 2001.
International workers in Kandahar don't feel safe any more and some have been moved from the Kandahar region to safer areas, says John Oerum, southwest security officer for the United Nations.
But Oerum is trying to find a way to stay in southern Afghanistan. To abandon it would be to let the rebel forces win, he says.
The Red Cross, with 150 foreign workers in Afghanistan, has suspended operations indefinitely.
Today most Afghans say their National Army seems a distant dream while the US-led coalition continues to feed and finance warlords as reward for their help in hunting for Taliban and al-Qaeda fighters.
Karzai, the president's brother, says, "We have to pay more attention at the district level, build the administration. We know who these Taliban are, but we don't have the people to report them when they return."
Khan Mohammed, commander of Kandahar's 2nd Corps, says his soldiers haven't been paid in seven months, and his fighting force has dwindled.
The Kandahar police chief, Mohammed Akram, says he wants 50 extra police in each district where the Taliban have a stronghold. But he says his police haven't been paid in months and hundreds have just gone home.
"There is no real administration all over Afghanistan, no army, no police," Mohammed said. "The people do not want the Taliban, but we have to unite and build, but we are not."
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KevinTheOmnivore KevinTheOmnivore is offline
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Old Apr 7th, 2003, 10:57 PM       
*sigh*

Again, Rorschach with his Liberal bullshit.

WHY should we clean up a mess made by the Soviets!!!??
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Jeanette X Jeanette X is offline
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Old Apr 8th, 2003, 02:06 AM       
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinTheHerbivore
*sigh*

Again, Rorschach with his Liberal bullshit.

WHY should we clean up a mess made by the Soviets!!!??
Didn't WE promise to help them rebuild the country?
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Old Apr 8th, 2003, 02:19 AM        Whatever
That's exactly the kind of unsubstantiated fabrication that I'd expect from a hippy liberal like you!

We aren't the world's policemen. Just it's bulldozer.
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Old Apr 8th, 2003, 09:00 AM       
They're Tali-back!
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Old Apr 8th, 2003, 12:55 PM       
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinTheHerbivore
*sigh*

Again, Rorschach with his Liberal bullshit.

WHY should we clean up a mess made by the Soviets!!!??
Mmm ... because back in the 80s we backed the rebels that forced Russia out of there in the first place ... then we left those rebels that we backed high n' dry to a basically foundationless, lawless government ruled by warlords and financed by locally grown drugs ... those would be the same rebels who we then promised help that we never gave ... and basically helped laid the groundwork for the retribution that later came to innocent U.S. citizens in the form of the 9/11 Trajedy... well, for starters I mean. :/

Stuff like that tends to get other countries pissed at the U.S. and gives us the reputation of "the ugly American". Like Chris Rock said (paraphrasing) "It's not that I agree with the shit ... but I understand."
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KevinTheOmnivore KevinTheOmnivore is offline
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Old Apr 8th, 2003, 01:06 PM       
You're not a very good judge of sarcasm. :/

@ FS
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Old Apr 8th, 2003, 01:12 PM       
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinTheHerbivore
You're not a very good judge of sarcasm. :/

@ FS
I thought that sounded strange considering some of your earlier posts. I guess I wasn't really thinking. :/
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mburbank mburbank is offline
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Old Apr 8th, 2003, 03:33 PM       
Kev; this reminds me of back about a year ago when I said Chomsky was a pussy and you were a fag for citing him.

*Sigh* I was so new back then.
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Old Apr 8th, 2003, 04:20 PM       
what's so sad is that i don't see how under present circumstances we are going to be able to hold the administration accountable.
the american people are so thuroughly duped that sometimes i'm thinking its hopeless.

Isnt the cia pissed that the drug flow has been interrupted? or maybe it hasnt been, i don't know.
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The_Rorschach The_Rorschach is offline
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Old Apr 8th, 2003, 05:28 PM        Kerzai Soza Strikes Back
Kerzai Soza Strikes Back
(Usual Suspects allusion, 2pts! Star Wars reference 2pts!)

http://abcnews.go.com/wire/World/ap20030408_335.html

Afghan Troops Arrest 20 Taliban Suspects As U.S. Soldiers Scour Southern Afghan District
The Associated Press

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan April 8 ? American troops began a search for suspected Taliban fighters in a remote southern corner of Afghanistan on Tuesday, while Afghan government soldiers arrested 20 Taliban suspects in separate raids, officials said.
The U.S. soldiers were conducting house-to-house searches in Sangeen district of Helmand province, said Dad Mohammed Khan, head of the province's intelligence department.
He did not say how many U.S. troops were involved in the operation. The troops reached the area from their base in Kandahar, 60 miles to the southeast, Khan said. There was no immediate confirmation of the operation by U.S. officials at the base.
Khan said the American troops may be looking for former Taliban commanders Mullah Dadullah and Mullah Akhtar Mohammed. The two were reported in the area some time ago, according to the intelligence official.
Mullah Akhtar Mohammed and his brother, Abul Hassan, were in Sangeen district recently and distributed satellite phones and money among their supporters in several villages in the district, Khan said.
Separately, three Afghan government troops were wounded in a gun fight with suspected Taliban fighters in Zabul province, the region's governor, Hamidullah Khan, said Tuesday.
The soldiers were injured Sunday when nearly 50 Taliban fighters attacked a government checkpost in the Shingai district of Zabul province, Khan said.
The Taliban fled after a brief gun battle, but government troops captured 20 of them on Monday during raids on several villages in the region.
Meanwhile, a U.S. special forces soldier was slightly wounded during a military training exercise in southeastern Afghanistan, the U.S. military said Tuesday.
The soldier was hit in the ribs by shrapnel Monday in the town of Shkin in Paktika province, the U.S. military said in a statement.
The soldier was evacuated to a U.S. base in the eastern town of Khost, where he was treated and released, the statement said.
The soldier was not identified.

edit: Alright, Kevin, GA and Burbank. I got your numbers you facist shitbags. They may have stopped me from stealing that plane at LaGuardia and flying in straight through your cold, black little hearts, but I recently bought a chem set from Toys R Us and I'll be mailing you Anthrax soon. Think your CIA is the only one with means? DEATH TO ALL CONSERVATIVE PIGS!!! MAKE LOVE NOT WAR!!!!
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mburbank mburbank is offline
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Old Apr 9th, 2003, 12:39 PM       
American Bomb Kills 11 Afghan Civilians
Wed Apr 9, 8:30 AM ET

By Parwez Besmel

BAGRAM, Afghanistan (Reuters) - The U.S. military said 11 Afghan civilians, seven of them women, were killed early on Wednesday when an American bomb missed its target and landed on a house in eastern Afghanista





Keep in mind, this is happening in Afghanistan, where we won and the war is over.
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Old Apr 14th, 2003, 05:14 PM       
We are about to get mired a little deeper. I suppose everyone has heard about the recent raising on stakes in Kashmir due to the two assassinations (or are they still considered questionable deaths?), so the implications are pretty obvious:

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...an_pakistan_dc

Afghan Official Says Pakistan Backing Taliban
Mon Apr 14, 7:23 AM ET Add World - Reuters to My Yahoo!

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (Reuters) - An Afghan official accused Pakistan on Monday of backing the re-emergence of the fundamentalist Taliban militia, and of involvement in the murder of two relatives of a provincial governor.


A cousin and another relative of Kandahar Governor Gul Agha Sherzai were killed by suspected Taliban militants in the Pakistani border town of Chaman on Sunday, while his brother, Sharif Sherzai, was also injured.

"Pakistan's hand is behind this event," Governor Sherzai's spokesman, Khalid Pashtun, told Reuters.

"The Taliban carried out the attack, but it happened in areas under the control of Pakistan and we have in the past passed on to them our complaints about their support for the Taliban.

"Without the support of Pakistan, the Taliban would not have been able to do it," he said.

The attack, carried out by two people on motorcycles, came a day after the governor's son, Asif, was beaten up in Chaman by several people, including Pakistani army officials, Pashtun said.

He said the shooting was carried out by members of the ousted Taliban regime which Pakistan backed until the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. The Taliban was ousted by U.S.-backed opposition groups in late 2001.

Around a thousand Afghans, mostly local government officials, demonstrated outside Pakistan's mission in Kandahar to protest against the killings, witnesses said.
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mburbank mburbank is offline
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Old Apr 14th, 2003, 08:30 PM       
I think by deffinition we can't fet mired in wars we've already won like Afghanistan and Iraq. So don't say that again. Besides, it's wrong for you to talk that way when our troops are about to go to war with Syria.
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Old Apr 14th, 2003, 10:26 PM       
war#3


I think I might need to revise the "how much war could a wood chuck war" thread now
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Old Apr 15th, 2003, 12:30 PM       
Quote:
Originally Posted by mburbank
I think by deffinition we can't fet mired in wars we've already won like Afghanistan and Iraq. So don't say that again. Besides, it's wrong for you to talk that way when our troops are about to go to war with Syria.
[center:ed7581c7b3]IS IT MY ROLL YET?[/center:ed7581c7b3]

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The_Rorschach The_Rorschach is offline
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Old Apr 15th, 2003, 03:52 PM       
Well, I wonder if we are going to redeploy troops, or just cut our losses and sky out. Calls for Jihad come often, but with the US planning to emplace an embargo against Syria and calling on them to relinquish WMD they may or may not have, we are going to quickly alienate the Middle Eastern population far more than the Taliban ever could have. If things continue to go as they have in the last two weeks, we could be in dire straights indeed.

There is another article following the first one. I was looking for another thread in which it might be pertinent, but I have to get to class, so I'm going to drop it here.

----------
http://www.paknews.com/main.php?id=1&date1=2003-04-15

Taliban Supreme Leader Calls For Jehad

Muhammad Khurshid
Updated on 2003-04-15 07:48:46

PESHAWAR, Pakistan: Apr 14 (PNS) - Supreme leader of Taliban Movement leader Mullah Muhammad Omar has claimed that jehad has become obligatory on the Muslims all over the world as anti-Muslim forces have joined hands for their (Muslims) elimination.

“If we do not realize the gravity of the situation then no force on the Earth can save us from catastrophe,” said the Taliban leader in a message circulated among the people in eastern parts of Afghanistan.

He said that the people of Afghanistan and Iraq should prepare themselves for jehad as this was the only way for them to save themselves from brutalities of US forces. “The US forces have perpetrated a reign of terror in the whole world, but the Muslims rulers have been keeping a complete silence, which is very dangerous for the whole Muslims,” the Mullah stated in the message to the residents of eastern Afghanistan.

Meanwhile, according to IRIN report, Hakim Taniwal, the governor of Afghanistan’s volatile eastern province of Khost said that the country’s former hardline Islamist Taliban rulers were regrouping in an effort to step up anti-government militancy. There are fears that this could further harm security in the region and impact on aid work and reconstruction. "We know that they are preparing, but they will not be able to achieve anything," he said, adding that although a lot of reports were being received about Taliban activities, little movement had been seen on ground. 'The reality is that there are increased Taliban-related security incidents compared to the past,” he said. Officials in Khost maintain that recently two Taliban fighters and two government soldiers died in a gun battle in Zhawara District of the province.

However, he maintained that the province was under control. “I do not buy the impression that Taliban can stage a massive comeback, despite their recent attacks,” he maintained. "They brutalised ordinary people, and it’s impossible to win back popular support," he added.

The End.
--------------
2!
--------------

http://reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml...toryID=2568299

Afghan Commander, Bodyguards, Killed in Ambush
Tue April 15, 2003 08:50 AM ET
MAZAR-I-SHARIF, Afghanistan (Reuters) - A military commander belonging to the Afghan faction of ethnic Uzbek warlord Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostum and two of his bodyguards were killed on Tuesday in an ambush in the trouble-plagued north.

Commander Shahi was driving to the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif when his car was ambushed in the Char Bolak area about 18 miles to the west, one of Dostum's deputies, General Majid Roozi, told Reuters.

The identity of Shahi's assailants was not known, but Dostum's faction has a tense rivalry with the Jamiat-e-Islami group led by ethnic Tajik Ustad Atta Mohammad.

Shahi, who led about 300 fighters, served for more than 15 years as a commander for Dostum.

Although Dostum and Atta are both members of the central government of President Hamid Karzai, their forces have clashed repeatedly in the past year for control of territory in the north. Shahi's killing came a week after bitter clashes between Atta and Dostum's fighters in Maimana, the capital of Faryab province, in which 16 people, including one of Atta's commanders and two civilians, were killed.

A temporary truce was enforced in Maimana after talks involving officials of both factions and the United Nations, but reports from the town on Tuesday said the situation remained tense and the two factions were prepared for a possible resumption of fighting.

Factional rivalry like that in the north is seen as a key threat to Karzai's government, which has struggled to assert itself in the provinces since it replaced the fundamentalist Taliban regime in late 2001.
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KevinTheOmnivore KevinTheOmnivore is offline
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Old Apr 26th, 2003, 12:36 PM       
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/04/26/in...rint&position=

April 26, 2003
In Afghanistan, Violence Stalls Renewal Effort

By CARLOTTA GALL

KABUL, Afghanistan, April 25 — In the middle of the main road between Kabul and Kandahar lie two bombed-out, rusted fuel trucks, destroyed in American strikes in October 2001. That no one — not the Americans, nor international aid workers, nor Afghans themselves — has dragged them out of the way shows how little has been done to mend Afghanistan since the 2001 war, despite promises of copious foreign assistance.

In a very real sense, the war here has not ended — as shown by an attack today that killed two American soldiers and by a planned visit on Sunday from Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld. Nearly every day, there are killings, explosions, shootings and targeted attacks on foreign aid workers, Afghan officials, and American forces, as well as continuing feuding between warlords in the regions.

No clear picture exists of who will provide the security to stop the bloodshed: the government of President Hamid Karzai, which still has no national army or police force; or the international force of 5,000 peacekeepers here in the capital; or the 11,500 Americans, Romanians and other foreign soldiers still in the provinces hunting for the Taliban and Al Qaeda.

For months now, the American military here has talked of moving into "Phase Four," which would mean winding down combat activities and entering a period of reconstruction. Yet the military is still mounting large-scale combat operations in the pursuit of armed groups of rebels in mountain hideouts, and turning villages upside down in a search for suspects and weapons that is making the foreign presence ever more unpopular with Afghans.

In southern and eastern Afghanistan, the exiled Taliban movement has been resurgent since December. Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, a renegade mujahedeen commander and former American ally, has called for a holy war against "occupying forces."

The attack today, which killed an American soldier near a Special Forces base close to Shkin in eastern Afghanistan, was particularly brazen. About 20 rebels opened fire on a platoon of American and Afghan soldiers in broad daylight, wounding at least six other soldiers before retreating across the border to Pakistan, as many attackers have in recent weeks. A second American soldier later died of wounds from the battle, Reuters reported.

Cross-border violence has risen so much that President Karzai, apparently with the backing of the United States, took the unusual step this week of naming the fugitive Taliban leaders he wants Pakistan to hand over to his government in Kabul.

His administration appears equally hamstrung, however, when it comes to reducing the power of the warlords, who often put personal interest before national unity, but who have been virtually the only source of security for ordinary Afghans, who have been looking for safety and some form of economic subsistence since Afghanistan began to fall into chaos more than two decades ago, during the Soviet invasion in 1979.

Fixing the Kabul-Kandahar road, one of the main arteries of the country, has been a priority of the Karzai government. It is part of the American-led $180 million plan to repair main roads and provide hundreds of jobs. Yet now, in the second year of reconstruction, there is no sign of any work being done all along this 300 miles of ruts and holes.

American soldiers at their headquarters at Bagram Air Base, near Kabul, share many of the apprehensions of the Afghan public — despite their public, official optimism on their ability to secure both Afghanistan and Iraq. "I don't feel comfortable watching us start on another war when this remains unfinished," one soldier at Bagram said recently, insisting on anonymity. "It would have been better if we could have moved into Phase Four before they started in Iraq."

After their grueling hikes through the Afghan mountains, American troops often head back to base with little to show for their effort. The international coalition here regularly announces that weapons caches have been seized and destroyed, but there have been few important arrests made, and no pause in attacks on American bases and Afghan government posts and personnel.

A recent two-week operation with 500 Special Forces and airborne infantry troops in the Baghran Valley in the southern province of Helmand failed to net its main prey — Abdul Waheed, the local chief of Baghran, and another former Taliban commander, Mullah Kabir. Both men got away, and Mr. Waheed later told friends that he had made it to the safety of Quetta in Pakistan, an American official said.

The continuing airborne assaults and rough searches are angering Afghan villagers, especially when fatal errors are made. One of those, an airstrike that was meant for a group of rebels but that hit a house in eastern Afghanistan this month, killed 11 members of a family as they slept. The bombing occurred near Shkin, where today's attack happened and where the first signs of renewed rebel activity emerged last Dec. 21, when an American soldier on patrol was shot dead.

The recent operation in Helmand left one shepherd dead and five people injured, three of them children. A trail of houses was trashed and looted; other families wept to see their male breadwinners detained.

The popularity of the American presence was also not increased by the deaths of two men among a group of Afghans arrested and held for interrogation at Bagram Air Base in December.

Small boys make obscene gestures at American troops as they pass by villages in Khost Province, and villagers complain that the Americans are arresting the wrong people, often because they are misled by the local militias working with them who hunt down personal enemies.

A former mujahedeen commander, Hajji Spin Bacha Zadran, 60, who was held for a month in the Bagram detention center last fall, said he told his captors they were encouraging animosity among Afghans.

"I told them they should not arrest innocent people and they should try to be close to the people and should not make the people angry, because already now the people do not like them because they are arresting innocent people," he said in an interview at his home in the eastern town of Khost.

In a tea house in Khost, where scores of arrests have been made over the past months, residents listened keenly to a conversation about the American presence in Afghanistan.

One speaker praised the Americans because, he said, they have prevented Afghan militias' feuding. But the room fell into an appalled silence when it was suggested that American forces would stay for as long as a decade. "Oh my God!" muttered one man, turning his back on the speaker in disgust.

"There is a widening gap between the Afghan people and the Americans," warned a senior government official on his return from the eastern border regions.

American officials say the military has learned the bitter lessons of working too closely with any one clan or tribe, often ending up being used to further local vendettas. But their critics say they are not moving fast enough to cut ties with troublemakers.

The American commander in Afghanistan, Lt. Gen. Daniel K. McNeill, has stressed the importance of treating villagers with respect and of rebuilding and bringing in aid after combat operations, his top commander in southern Afghanistan, Lt. Col. John Campbell, said in a recent interview. But it does not always work.

"We will not be angry if they help us and do not bother us," said Pai Muhammad, a villager in the Baghran Valley. "Up until now, I have not become angry, but then they have not killed anyone in my family." But the villagers of Lejay were so embittered after Special Forces spent 10 days in their village, conducting searches and making arrests, that they wrote an open letter to the United Nations mission in Afghanistan.

"The Americans searched our province," the letter reads in part. "They did not find Mullah Omar, they did not find Osama bin Laden, and they did not find any Taliban. They arrested old men, drivers, and shopkeepers, and they injured women and children."

These villagers said they did not see any of the aid that United States forces said they would airlift into the region.

The escalating violence has also slowed reconstruction. A series of attacks on nongovernmental agencies culminated in the killing of an expatriate Red Cross worker in Kandahar last month, prompting most agencies to scale back their work in the most needy south and southeastern regions.

"Thousands of people are going to suffer from this," said one aid worker as he prepared to pull his team of four foreign workers out of refugee camps in the south.

Already frustrated last year by the slowness of reconstruction and the failure of aid organizations to reach the more remote areas, the American military decided last fall to use military civil affairs teams to take reconstruction efforts to the turbulent regions.

The idea is to position civil affairs personnel backed up by Special Forces for security — groups of up to 60 or even 100 people — in as many as 10 places around Afghanistan. The teams have a total of $12 million for projects they oversee, and they hire local contractors to do the building.

In Kabul, foreign diplomats have welcomed the idea of a larger military presence in the regions, particularly because no country is prepared to expand the 5,000-member international peacekeeping force in the capital out to the border regions.

But the plan was immediately criticized by relief groups. The United Nations gently pointed out that it was responsible for coordinating aid, and the nongovernmental aid agencies expressed alarm about becoming associated with the military, suggesting that the soldiers stick to the bigger projects — roads, bridges, government buildings — that aid groups cannot manage.

In the end, some aid officials say, the teams will fail because they are neither one thing nor another.

"They are undermanned, underresourced and are focusing on the wrong areas," said Paul O'Brien of CARE International, the American-based aid group, which has long experience in Afghanistan.

Most aid agencies, and many Afghans around the country, would like foreign troops to disarm the private militias, reduce continuing robbery and extortion, and curb the power of the warlords, Mr. O'Brien said.

But the military teams are concentrating on small-scale projects — building schools, or even just providing desks and latrines for them — while the larger issues of disarmament and peacekeeping are left unfinished, he said.

Rafael Robillard, the director of a coordinating body of international aid agencies in Kabul, summed up the frustration of many aid workers. "I was talking to one civil affairs guy, and we were looking at a kindergarten the American military was building, and the soldier turned to me and said, `Why aren't you guys doing anything about disarmament?' I could not believe it. The military is building kindergartens, and they are asking me, a civilian aid worker, to do disarmament! The world is upside down."
-30-
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